Europe > Beyond Brexit
09 Mar '17

In 1957, the six EU founding members–Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg—agreed to settle their conflicts around a table rather than on the battlefields. We are now days away from the 60th anniversary of the EC Treaty Rome. Like all anniversaries, the Rome Summit will be a natural time to reflect on the last 60 years at a time when BREXIT and the fear of a “domino effect” across Europe is driving change. The European Commission’s “White Paper on the Future of Europe” (“Paper”) was written to help the European Council decide on a course of action by year-end, with a view to implementing a plan to be rolled out in time for the European Parliament elections in June 2019. Whilst BREXIT is only indirectly referred to, references to “EU27” abound, alongside references to the refugee crisis, terrorism, the global financial crisis and “new global powers”. The EU may still be home to the world's largest single market, however “Europe's place in the world is shrinking.” This comes at a time when newer powers such as China, Brazil, India and Mexico, rise, and when the United States becomes more inward-looking. Other notable challenges include unemployment and friction over borders.

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05 Aug '16

In the aftermath of Brexit, the United Kingdom is faced with the challenge of negotiating a relationship with the European Union that balances Single Market access with national control over the movement of goods and workers. This article is the last of a four-part series examining the three models for a future U.K.-EU relationship.

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01 Aug '16

In the aftermath of Brexit, the United Kingdom is faced with the challenge of negotiating a relationship with the European Union that balances Single Market access with national control over the movement of goods and workers. This article is the third of a four-part series examining the three models for a future U.K.-EU relationship.

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20 Jul '16

In the aftermath of Brexit, the United Kingdom is faced with the challenge of negotiating a relationship with the EU that balances Single Market access with national control over the movement of goods and workers. This article is the second of a four-part series examining the three models for a future U.K.-EU relationship.

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14 Jul '16

In the aftermath of Brexit, the United Kingdom is faced with the challenge of negotiating a relationship with the European Union that balances Single Market access with national control over the movement of goods and workers. This article is the first of a four-part series examining the three models for a future U.K.-EU relationship.

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24 Jun '16

The UK vote to Brexit has material economic, financial, commercial, political, legal and social implications. Once the UK government has formally notified the European Council of its citizens’ decision to leave the EU, the UK has a so-called two-year “divorce” period in which to negotiate a withdrawal agreement pursuant to Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU). Outgoing Prime Minister Cameron has said that he does not expect his successor to be elected for several months and that he currently does not expect the two-year withdrawal period to start before October. On this basis, EU law would cease to apply to UK citizens from October 2018. However, senior EU leadership has told Cameron that notice needs to be given earlier, because, otherwise, the UK would be involved for a longer period of time in EU lawmaking that would never apply to the country.

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